RUSSIAN  ELECTRICITY PRICES

 

JUST HOW MUCH ARE YOU PAYING FOR ELECTRICITY PER KILOWATT HOUR IN YOUR COUNTRY, COMPARED TO OTHER COUNTRIES?

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Electricity grids are key to renewable energy distribution

 

 

There is an abundance of clean, renewable, wind and solar energy that can produce green hydrogen and electricity to charge vehicle batteries, but there is no transport infrastructure to support rapid energy exchanges, refuel hydrogen vehicles and load level.

 

 

 


RUSSIAN ELECTRICITY PRICES

In Russia, as of June 2023 the electricity prices were as follows:


- For households, the electricity price is approximately 5.38 Russian rubles per kWh or 5.8 U.S. dollar cents per kWh.

 

- For businesses, itís around 7.9 Russian rubles per kWh or 8.5 U.S. dollar cents per kWh.

 

 

 

 


The war in Ukraine has significantly impacted Russian electricity prices, leading to a complex and multifaceted energy crisis. Letís delve into the key changes and consequences:

HIGHER ENERGY PRICES

 

Energy prices are rising, with high fuel costs accounting for 90% of the increase in average costs for electricity generation worldwide. Approximately 70 million people who recently gained access to electricity now find it unaffordable due to these rising prices. Additionally, around 100 million people may no longer be able to cook using clean fuels and might revert to using biomass instead [1].

 

CHANGING TRADE FLOWS & SUPPLY SHORTAGES

 

The war has disrupted energy markets, leading to volatility and uncertainty. Strict sanctions on the Russian energy sector have further complicated supply dynamics. Markets are grappling with assessing the potential implications for global energy supplies [1].

 

Are their any positive aspects amid the crisis? While the situation is challenging, higher fossil fuel prices provide strong incentives to accelerate the transition toward sustainable alternatives. However, the need for energy security may still drive investment in fossil fuel projects [1].

 

The war in Ukraine has had a profound impact on global energy markets, particularly oil and gas prices. Letís explore how the free world responded to this crisis.

Following Russiaís invasion of Ukraine, oil prices surged to over $110 per barrel. This represented a significant increase from previous levels. Major oil benchmarks traded above $110, reflecting a 15% rise in just one week [6]. The risk of supply disruptions was not fully priced in, and further upward movement was anticipated.

 

ENERGY EXPORT ALTERNATIVES & STRATEGIC RESERVES RELEASE

 

European countries sought alternatives to Russian energy supplies. Reports suggested that refiners should avoid taking Russian oil. Despite the crisis, Russia continued to find markets for most of its production by offering discounts of $15-20 [6]. 

 

In response, OECD countries decided to release 60 million barrels of oil from their strategic reserves. This move aimed to ease price pressure. However, such actions historically have only short-lived and limited impact on prices. The released oil would need replenishment in the near future [6].

 

The Biden administration banned Russian oil imports to the US. The combination of strong economic recovery and low investment in oil production, exacerbated by the invasion, led to stratospheric oil prices, affecting consumers at the pump [6].

 

The free world grappled with rising energy costs, explored alternative sources, and took strategic measures to mitigate the impact of the crisis while avoiding direct support for Putinís war against Ukraine [6][7]. ����️��

 

 

 

Chinaís president, Xi Jinping, acknowledged in his new yearís message that ďsome enterprises had a tough timeĒ in 2023 as data showed a weakening of factory production deepened this month, but he vowed to step up the pace of the economyís recovery.

 

 


In summary, Russiaís invasion of Ukraine has created shockwaves in global energy markets, affecting prices, supply chains, and energy security. The consequences will be felt for years to come, particularly in poorer countries that bear the brunt of this crisis [1]. 

 

 

AFRICAN ELECTRICITY PRICES

AUSTRALASIAN ELECTRICITY PRICES

CANADIAN ELECTRICITY PRICES

CHINESE ELECTRICITY PRICES
EUROPEAN ELECTRICITY PRICES

MIDDLE EASTERN ELECTRICITY PRICES

NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRICITY PRICES (USA)

RUSSIAN ELECTRICITY PRICES

SOUTH AMERICAN ELECTRICITY PRICES
SOUTH ASIAN ELECTRICITY PRICES

UKRAINIAN ELECTRICITY PRICES

ELECTRICITY PRICES UNITED KINGDOM

 

 

As you may imagine, if you are running a business that uses lots of energy. Location is an important factor in remaining competitive. Industry could be based near the Sahara desert, where massive solar installations make sense. And yet, there is little by way of industrial activity. Africa, is thus a blossoming energy market. Recognised in both the EGYPES and ADIPEC energy shows. With many other events concentrating on renewables like green hydrogen and electrolyzers.

The following is a a performance league table for best electricity prices, ranking countries from the cheapest to the most expensive based on the information available on the web. Remember that these rankings are subject to change over time, but as of the data available in March 2024, hereís a top ten list:

Sudan: USD 0.006 per kWh (household price)
Kyrgyzstan: USD 0.049 per kWh (household price)
Bulgaria: USD 0.078 per kWh (average household price)
Hungary: USD 0.078 per kWh (average household price)
Malta: USD 0.078 per kWh (average household price)
Kazakhstan: USD 0.079 per kWh (household price)
Uzbekistan: USD 0.080 per kWh (household price)
Tajikistan: USD 0.081 per kWh (household price)
Turkmenistan: USD 0.082 per kWh (household price)
Moldova: USD 0.083 per kWh (household price)

Please note that these rankings may not reflect the current situation. Factors such as subsidies, energy mix, and economic conditions contribute to these prices. Weíll explore the means of electricity generation in more depth later.

Letís take a look at the electricity prices in Sudan and Kyrgyzstan, along with their potential connections to sustainability and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 7 (SDG 7).

ELECTRICITY PRICES IN SUDAN

 

As of June 2023, the price of electricity in Sudan is remarkably low. Here are the details:

- Household Price: SDG 5.000 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) or approximately USD 0.006 per kWh.
- Business Price: SDG 26.000 per kWh or approximately USD 0.029 per kWh.

 

These prices include all components of the electricity bill, such as the cost of power, distribution, and taxes. For comparison, the average global electricity price during that period was around USD 0.154 per kWh for households and USD 0.151 per kWh for businesses.

ELECTRICITY PRICES IN KYRGYSTAN

In Kyrgyzstan, the electricity prices are also notably low. As of June 2023:

Household Price: KZT 22.070 per kWh or approximately USD 0.049 per kWh.
Business Price: KZT 28.850 per kWh or approximately USD 0.064 per kWh.

 

Again, these prices include all components of the electricity bill. Kyrgyzstanís low electricity prices contribute to its energy affordability for both households and businesses. However, itís essential to understand the context behind these prices.

POSSIBLE REASONS FOR LOW PRICES

Energy Mix: Both Sudan and Kyrgyzstan have diverse energy sources, including hydropower and other renewables. Hydropower, being a renewable resource, often leads to lower electricity costs, begging the question why is electricity priced higher in Canada.

 

Subsidies: Governments in these countries may provide subsidies to keep electricity prices affordable for citizens. These subsidies can help mitigate the cost of power generation.

 

Economic Factors: Economic conditions, currency exchange rates, and overall development levels influence energy prices. Lower costs of production and distribution can contribute to lower prices.

 

Historical Context: Historical energy policies and infrastructure investments play a role. For example, Kyrgyzstan has a long-standing tradition of hydropower development.

 

CONNECTION TO SDG 7

SDG 7 aims to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all. Both Sudan and Kyrgyzstanís low electricity prices align with this goal. By providing affordable energy, they contribute to economic development, poverty reduction, and improved living standards. However, itís essential to balance affordability with environmental sustainability and climate change mitigation.

Efforts to achieve SDG 7 involve enhancing energy efficiency, promoting renewable energy sources, and fostering international cooperation. Both countries can continue working toward sustainable energy systems while ensuring affordability for their citizens.

 

 

 

You may have noticed the disparity between the current UK supply rates, .25 to .26 pence per kWh, compared with the purchase price .07725. There is a whopping .18275 pence price differential per kWh - generating massive share dividends, as it appears. We wonder how much the Grid (power Networks UK) charge for using their infrastructure? When there is already a gigantic standing charge of some .45 - .54 pence per day. Presumably, the payment for renting the Grid power-lines and substation distribution network?

 

 

Please note that exchange rates can fluctuate, so itís essential to check real-time rates for precise conversions. Anyway you look at it, in the EU consumers are being ripped off, to benefit rich shareholding investors. Maybe, it's time for change? To allow the people, to take back control of their energy prices. We cannot help but make a reference to Financial Slavery at this point. Because, high food and energy prices lead to food and energy poverty. Kicking in other UN SDGs: 1, 2, 3 and 10, 11, 12.

 

BASIC HUMAN RIGHTS

 

Electricity should be cheaply available to all, as a basic human right. As per Sustainability Development Goal 7. It is the duty of every government to strive to achieve affordable clean energy for their administrative geographical region. Profits should not come into the frame, where it introduces energy poverty, or financial slavery. Privatization of existing grids can lead to a focus on shareholder profits over grid modernization and expansion, making electricity less affordable for low-income populations. This is particularly detrimental in developing nations where access to reliable energy is crucial for basic needs and development. Unfortunately, in Russia, the total lack of free elections, undermines the democratic process, regardless of the electricity supply price. Vladimir Putin's dictatorship encourages their billionaires to invest overseas, by way of Imperialist back door expansion. Another good reason not to allow foreign investment in land in another nation. Such practices, if not limited to one house per foreign national, threatens the sovereignty of the host nation. Apart from the money laundering element of such transactions.

 

PROFITEERING & MORALS

 

You may be asking why people should profit from energy and is that legal? Mostly, energy companies have shareholders who derive an income based on share dividends. Sometimes those energy companies would rather they grab a nice profit for themselves, rather than invest in renewables and infrastructure (storage), to make electricity cheaper for their customers. If this is happening in your region, it is because politicians are allowing it to continue. Whereas, policy changes, as statutory requirements - making it law, could force suppliers to invest first, with dividends later. Provided only that a good level of investment has been made. Otherwise, suppliers, and of course the infrastructure network (in the UK Power Networks) should lose their franchise.

 

THE CASE FOR NATIONALIZATION 

 

The alternative is nationalization, where there are no dividends or shareholders to leach off a captive market. Then, the matter of procurement fraud may rise to the surface as something to keep an eye open for. As in tender bids and transparent tendering. A State operated Grid, Power Storage, and State operated Power Stations, Solar and Wind Farms, would seem to be the only way that SDG7 might be complied with.

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.globalpetrolprices.com/Russia/electricity_prices/
https://www.statista.com/statistics/263492/electricity-prices-in-selected-countries/
https://www.pragya.org/
https://www.mppmcl.com/
https://anocab.com/
https://www.expatica.com/ru/living/household/utilities-in-russia-970011/
https://www.statista.com/topics/9680/energy-sector-in-russia/
https://medium.com/intratec-products-blog/electricity-price-russia-q1-2023-e4d3d61bfc2d

[1] https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/11/russia-ukraine-invasion-global-energy-crisis/
[2] https://www.ecb.europa.eu/press/economic-bulletin/focus/2022/html/ecb.ebbox202204_01~68ef3c3dc6.en.html
[3] https://www.cer.eu/insights/impact-ukraine-war-global-energy-markets
[4] https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2023/02/russia-ukraine-war-energy-costs/
[5] https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/why-russia-s-ukraine-invasion-spiked-energy-prices-4-charts-n1289799
[6] https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/03/how-does-the-war-in-ukraine-affect-oil-prices/
[7] https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-60473233
[8] https://www.bbc.com/news/business-63855030
[9] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_response_to_the_Rwandan_genocide
[10] https://www.itv.com/news/2022-02-24/how-has-the-world-reacted-to-russias-military-operation-in-ukraine
[11] https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/z9hnqhv/revision/6
[12] https://www.jfklibrary.org/learn/about-jfk/jfk-in-history/the-cold-war-in-berlin

https://earth-planet.org/

https://earth-planet.org/

[1] https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/11/russia-ukraine-invasion-global-energy-crisis/
[2] https://www.ecb.europa.eu/press/economic-bulletin/focus/2022/html/ecb.ebbox202204_01~68ef3c3dc6.en.html
[3] https://www.cer.eu/insights/impact-ukraine-war-global-energy-markets
[4] https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2023/02/russia-ukraine-war-energy-costs/
[5] https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/why-russia-s-ukraine-invasion-spiked-energy-prices-4-charts-n1289799
[6] https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/03/how-does-the-war-in-ukraine-affect-oil-prices/
[7] https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-60473233
[8] https://www.bbc.com/news/business-63855030
[9] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_response_to_the_Rwandan_genocide
[10] https://www.itv.com/news/2022-02-24/how-has-the-world-reacted-to-russias-military-operation-in-ukraine
[11] https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/z9hnqhv/revision/6
[12] https://www.jfklibrary.org/learn/about-jfk/jfk-in-history/the-cold-war-in-berlin

https://www.globalpetrolprices.com/Russia/electricity_prices/
https://www.statista.com/statistics/263492/electricity-prices-in-selected-countries/
https://www.pragya.org/
https://www.mppmcl.com/
https://anocab.com/
https://www.expatica.com/ru/living/household/utilities-in-russia-970011/
https://www.statista.com/topics/9680/energy-sector-in-russia/
https://medium.com/intratec-products-blog/electricity-price-russia-q1-2023-e4d3d61bfc2d

 

 

 

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